Deathcard of Alois Brocher - 02/03/42 †

Updated: 6 days ago




The grouping here shows a death card and a personal cross that would have been carried by Soldaten or kept at home by family members at the time. The Deathcard seem here like many is a sad account of the passing of a Soldat in service. The Deathcards were usually issued on the confirmation of death or at funerals of the Soldat. This Deathcard is in a "book style" which shows the portrait of the fallen Soldat on the left and the description as well as a prayer on the right.


The Deathcard reads in German as:


Gebetsandenken

an

Alois Brocher

Unteroffizier in einer Panzer Abt

Teilnehmer am Einsatz Österreich, Sudetenland, Tschechei, an den Feldzügen in Polen und Frankreich

Bindermeisters Sohn Von Lalling

welcher am 2 März 1942 im kampf gegen den bolschewismus in treuer soldatischerssflichterfulllung im von nicht ganz 24 jahnren auf dem felde der

ehre gefallen ist

----

Fern von der heimat treu geliebten auen starbst du den heldetod furs vaterland doch wenn auch nimmer wir deinuntliß schauen , du bleibst bei uns durch heilger liebe band. Gleich lichten dein bild ist treu bewahrt im herzensschrein fur uns babst du dahin dein jungs leben auf wiedershn dort uberm sternenschein!

----

Barmherziger Jesus, gib ihm die ewige ruhe!

The English translation for this reads:

Prayer Keepsake

To

Alois Brocher

Unteroffizier In a Panzer Abeteilung

Participant in the operations in Austria, the Sudetenland, the Bohemian and Moravian areas of Czecheslovakia, and combatant in the campaigns in Poland and France

Construction Foreman's son from Lalling

Which on March 2, 1942 in the fight against Bolshevism in faithful military service in the field of not quite 24 years

has fallen with honour

----

Far from the homeland, loyally beloved, you died the heroic death for your fatherland, but even if we never look to your inappropriateness, you stay with us through holy love ties. Immediately light up your image is faithfully preserved in the shrine of the heart for us you babble there your young life goodbye there over the starlight!

----

Merciful Jesus, give him eternal rest!


The deathcard tells us that Alois Brocher Farther's occupation was a Construction Foreman and his hometown was Lalling. Lalling is a municipality in Lower Bavaria district in Deggendorf, Germany. Alois was an Unteroffizier in a Panzer Abteilung in the Heer. Himself being part of a tank crew, suggested that he could have been apart of a crew manning a Panzer III or IV. Alois was awarded the Austria Anschluss medal and Sudetenland Medal. These are seen just in his portrait of the Deathcard worn in Feldspange. The Austrian Anschluss seen with a miniature of the medal in the centre of the Feldspange. Seen next to it is the Sudetenland Medal with Prague Bar. The Prague bar being awarded for both October 1938 and March 1939 participation in the annexation of the Sudetenland.

Alois also fought in the Poland and French campaigns, however he met his fate when fighting against the Bolsheviks. Alois died on the 2nd March 1942 aged 23 years old (Mentioned nearly 24 years old). The young Unteroffizier is seen in his portrait wearing an M36 tunic with a Schirmmütze in his crisp portrait. A fitting portrait for the Deathcard that captures his youth and character.


The Deathcard details the Religious wishes of the family in a Supplication seen below his information in addition to two more on the reverse as seen with religious pictures of Jesus on the Cross and a statement by Pope Leo XIII in 1883 under the Mary image. The Deathcard is presented respectfully and was designed by a Jakob Adler (as detailed on the bottom right on the front).


Just one of many young lives lost during the war. This Deathcard being all that the family could hold on to as their loved one fell whilst serving his country. A mixture of sadness and pride. A crisp Deathcard in the collection that we share with respect and remembrance of the young Unteroffizier's life, not even reaching 24 Years old.


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© 2016 (Reviewed and Represented 2020) by The Kriegsberichter 41